Challenges of nursing care of advanced dementia

Get Expert's Help on Nursing

Introduction:

Dementia is a generic concept used to define a category of neurodegenerative progressive syndromes in which cognitive decline contributes to a reduction in memory, reasoning and learning, as well as to loss in attitude and actions that impairs day-to-day living function (WHO, 2017). Dementia-related clinical symptoms can be divided into three phases: early, mid and forward-looking (Mataqi, M. et al. 2018). The research focuses on the challenges of advanced dementia care. Dementia incidence is growing steadily and now exceeds nearly 50 million people worldwide1. The dementia prevalence is estimated at around 9.9 million new cases annually worldwide and places dementia at the top of global health security (WHO, 2017, Mataqi, M., et al., 2018).

The palliative method becomes an appropriate choice for diagnosis and is a final condition of pain and suffering. Depth cognitive and physical impairment is the stage of advanced dementia (Prince M et al . 2016). Dysphagia, inability to speak and significant losses in memory are indicative of the disorder (Davies N et al . 2014). The WHO described palliative care (PC) as 'an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families, through the prevention and treatment of pain and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual issues, with a life-threatening condition' (WHO, 2018; Connor S et al., 2014). 

The International Alliance for Palliative Care and the WHO both identified early dementia as a disorder for living and illness involving end-of-life palliative treatment. In the case of severe dementia, the same principle applies as defined by Europe's Palliative Care Association. The World Palliative Care Alliance and the WHO considers severe dementia as life-limiting and end-of-life PC-intensive illness. Nevertheless, through its attempts, the WHO acknowledges the frequently unmet, undervalued and unprocessed palliative needs of individuals with dementia in certain areas (Carter, G. et al . 2017). Recent studies indicated that a strategy of PC could be useful for severe dementia patients, but the implementation process remains a unique challenge. Several studies examined the barriers to sufficient PC supply for dementia patients (Champion, E. 2017). One of the major challenges is that in some areas, it is understood as a terminal disease, despite the progressive nature of dementia. Also, even if the cognitive and physical ability has gradually decreased, it is not possible to use abrupt health changes to identify a terminal phase of dementia, unlike trajectory of cancer (Poole, M. et al . , 2018).

However, comprehension difficulties in the advanced stage of dementia render treatment complicated to obtain and pose more obstacles to the effective delivery of PCs (Hill, E., 2018). Besides, several studies have shown that the role of health care professionals in the transfer of dementia patients to PC facilities is critical. However, they are unwilling (Kupeli, N and others, 2018). Lastly, the failure to provide optimum EoLC for this population in terms of care and clinical guidelines on PCs that are specific to dementia. This paper highlights the challenges of care for advanced dementia patients.

Background: 

Dementia is a progressive life-limiting disease of neurodegeneration. According to international research, patients with advanced dementia will benefit from palliative care (PC). However, research shows that, despite increasing recognition of their palliative needs, many currently fail to access such provision (Champion, E. 2017). Severe dementia has many symptoms and comorbidities of the somatic, cognitive, affective, and behavioural. Symptoms were similar to those in cancer development in the final months of existence at dementia at extremely elevated rates of pain. Carers must control their numerous dementia symptoms and the many factors that lead to mortality in particular. Dementia 'end stage' refers to pre-death time, when MMSE is too small to score and assumed to be zero. End stage dementia is distinguished although with encouragement by the loss of activities of daily living, erectile dysfunction, speech loss and nearly total dependence. Demise outcomes from co-morbidities. The advance of dementia in end-stage care imposes a need for complicated medical care such as whether to use antibiotics, a healthcare facility (home and old hospital vs) and a tube feeding facility (Kupeli, N. et al. , 2018). Because individuals with dementia can not talk or fix issues or give explicit consent to litigation, care decision-makers and family members may be active in care decisions. As in many developing nations, Australia is typically the largest source of dementia in a private elderly hospital (formerly "nursing home"). Residential care, however, does not mean palliative care by any means (Poole, M. et al . , 2018). The World Health Organization describes palliative care by identifying, assessing and treating pain and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual problems to improve the quality of living for those with a life-threatening illness and their families. Palliations can now be implemented at various stages of the disease continuum, not only at imminent deaths (WHO, 2015; Carter, G. et al . , 2017). However, palliative treatment in nursing aged facilities is not necessarily open to patients with non-malignant conditions. Besides, several studies have shown that the role of health care professionals in the transfer of dementia patients to PC facilities is critical. However, they are unwilling (Kupeli, N and others, 2018). Lastly, the failure to provide optimum EoLC for this population in terms of care and clinical guidelines on PCs that are specific to dementia. This paper highlights the challenges of care for advanced dementia patients.

Significance: 

This research indicates the issues affecting people with progressive dementia through their health treatment. Because of its existence, this analysis is particular than before. In the past, experiments on this topic have not been explicitly identified. This study is, therefore, different than before. Dementia occurrence is increasingly growing. The research focuses on the challenges of severe dementia care: the International Palliative Care Alliance, and the WHO identifies severe dementia as life-limiting and end-of-life PC-intensive illness. The treatment of severe dementia patients faces several difficulties. Some of the critical problems continue to under-identify it as a chronic condition in specific areas given the irreversible existence of dementia. Furthermore, while cognitive and physical capacities are deteriorating slowly, sudden improvements in health should not be introduced to explicitly define a final stage of dementia, as compared to the progression of cancer. The work reflects on the complexities of caring with early dementia.

Complete Solution

Hire Expert Tutors

Get Professional Tutoring at Low Price in Australia


Professional

Tutoring Services

25,187+

Orders Delivered

4.9/5

5 Star Rating

621

PhD Experts

 

Amazing Features

Plagiarism Free

Top Quality

Best Price

On-Time Delivery

100% Money Back

24 x 7 Support

TOP